Japanese Patterns

Every spring, I take a 1-2 week trip to Japan, the place where I grew up. I’ve come to appreciate my culture more deeply as I spend more and more time outside of Japan. This makes me wish that I paid more attention while I lived there, but I was too young and busy.

I just came back from my annual trip to Japan. This was the first trip since I started exploring the world of Zentangle, and it helped me to understand some of the reasons why I feel drawn to Zentangle designs.

Simple and beautiful patterns can be found everywhere in Japan. We call them Komon (pronounced like “common”) and it literally means “small patterns”.  They have been used on kimono fabrics and buildings for many centuries. As a traditional Japanese dance instructor, my grandmother often wore kimono and I remember some of them had simple geometric patterns much like we see in Zentangle.

One of the many attributes that foreigners praise about Japan is how we harmoniously mix something traditional with something very modern.

Here’s one example I saw by an escalator going up to the top floor of one of the newest department store buildings in Osaka.

These wooden panels are a modern application of a traditional Japanese architectural method. In order to bring more light into a room, carved wood panels (called “ranma”, shown in the image below) were installed in the upper part of the wall.

These panels are no longer used in modern Japanese houses but they are still available if you are willing to pay a small fortune for it. I happened to meet a 5th generation carpenter who takes custom wooden panel orders. He showed me a picture of huge hand carved panel that he’s been working on for about 10 months. I can’t remember the exact size of his project, but the panel itself is more expensive than my house! I guess if you can afford to buy a house that’s big enough to install it in a single wall in Japan, cost is not an issue…

For me, I settled with a couple of small wooden coasters from him. These are laser printed / cut to keep the price affordable, but nonetheless beautiful. If you are familiar with Zentangle patterns, you’ll see some very familiar designs on them like Crescent Moon and Keeko. But these are all traditional Japanese Komon patterns that have been used in Japan for centuries.

One of the Komon patterns that I saw in many different places throughout this trip is called Asanoha. I saw it on purses, tv show sets, coasters and even on bottled water!

I’m inspired to incorporate these traditional designs into my Zentangle practice.

日本の小紋柄

海外での生活が長くなるにしたがって、日本文化に対する敬意が深まってくるものです。日本に住んでいたころは、若かったのと、忙しかったのとで、改めて日本文化について深く考えたりしませんでした。残念なことをしたなと思っています。

毎年、1〜2週間、日本の家族や友人に会うために帰国しています。少し前に日本から戻ってきました。ゼンタングルを描くようになってから初めての帰国だったのですが、今回の旅を通して、どうして自然とゼンタングルに心が惹かれたのか、少しわかったような気がします。

日本では、様々な場面で繊細な模様を見かけます。いわゆる小紋柄ですね。着物の生地や日本建築の中に古くから取り入れられてきたものです。今は亡き祖母が日本舞踊を教えていたので、着物を日常的に目にして育ちました。そういえば、ゼンタングルっぽい小紋柄もあったな…と懐かしく思い出します。

日本は伝統的な古き良きものと近代的な新しいものを組み合わせるのが上手だと、外国の方々からの賞賛を受けています。まさにその例と言えるものが、2013年にオープンした大阪駅前グランフロントのエスカレーター横にありました!

これは伝統的な日本建築で使われる欄間をモチーフにしたものではないでしょうか。欄間とは、自然の光を室内に取り入れ、部屋の換気をよくするために、壁(天井と鴨居の間)に設けられる開口部材のことです。奈良時代から寺社建築に、平安時代から貴族の住宅建築に、江戸時代から一般住宅に取り入れられるようになったそうです。格子状のシンプルなものから、下の写真のような木彫りの繊細なデザインまで色々な欄間があります。

新築の家に見かけることはほとんどなくなりましたが、田舎の方の古い家や、寺社でよく目にします。豪華かつ繊細な欄間を彫ることができる職人さんが減っているのと、かかる手間暇を考えると、手彫りの欄間はけっこうなお値段になるそうです。京都の高島屋で、5代目の職人さんと少しお話しする機会がありました。現在受注・製作中の、とても大きな木彫りのパネル(欄間と呼んでよいのかちょっと不確かです)の写真を見せていただきました。実際の寸法は覚えていないのですが、大きな部屋の壁一面ぐらいかなと思います。ちなみにお値段は、そこいらの一軒家が買えるぐらいです。お金って、あるところにはあるんですね…

一般庶民の私は、職人さんのデザインしたコースターを2枚買って大満足です。これは手彫りではなくレーザーを使って作ってあるので、お手頃価格で購入できます。ゼンタングルをご存知の方にはお馴染みの、クレセントムーンやキーコのようなパターンが見受けられますが、どちらも日本に古くからある小紋柄です。ちなみに、クレセントムーンっぽいのは青海波、キーコっぽいのは市松という名称の小紋柄です。

今流行っているのか、色々な場面で同じ小紋柄を頻繁に見かけました。麻の葉と呼ばれるもので、カバン、テレビ番組のセット、コースター、そして炭酸水のボトルにまで使われていました!

日本の伝統的な小紋柄とゼンタングルのパターンをどうやって組み合わせようかな?とワクワクしています。